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Arts In Healthcare

List of written materials

Out in innerspace: a psychoanalyst explores the alternate therapies - S. Applebaum

Reference: S. Applebaum (1995) Out in innerspace: a psychoanalyst explores the alternate therapies, Northvale, NJ: Jason Aronson

This text discusses different therapies, subjecting them to a critical analysis from the standpoint of psychoanalytic theory. It should appeal to anyone interested in learning something about the spectrum of therapies available today.

 


Art in Healthcare: Does NHS art make you sick?- A Dix

Reference: A. Dix (1995) ‘Does NHS art make you sick?’ The Health Service Journal, 105 (5477), pp. 22-25.

(Unable to find abstract - if you find it, please contact the Lapidus Coordinator!)

 


Creative writing in Groupwork - R Dynes

Reference: R. Dynes (2001) Creative writing in groupwork, Bicester, Oxon: Speechmark Publishing

This book contains activities that are designed to help participants express themselves, explore situations, compare ideas and develop both imagination and creative ability. Bursting with more than 100 ideas and activities for encouraging creative writing as an effective activity for individuals and groups, it contains hundreds of alternatives, suggestions for further development and ideas for discussion. Barriers to writing and expression can be broken down with Robin's gentle advice.


The Hope of Therapy - Paul Gordon

Reference: P. Gordon (2008), The Hope of Therapy, Ross On Wye: PCCS Books Ltd

This book is an argument for therapeutic freedom at a time when hyper-regulation and state interference threaten to suffocate and dominate psychotherapeutic practice. Therapy is inherently an ethical endeavour, both in the sense that the therapist is called upon to be responsible to and for the other who seeks help, and in the sense that it is inevitably bound up with ideas about how we should live and how we should treat one another. Therapy is not a matter of technique but is rather an art or craft and has much to learn from other forms of art and craft, such as painting, fiction, music and poetry. Like artists, therapists need to feel free if they are to be truly creative. This book is an argument for that therapeutic freedom. Like art, therapy inevitably carries within it an idea of hope, hope both for the individual who seeks help and hope for a better world.

 


The Arts in Health Care: Learning from Experience - D Haldane and S. Loppert

Reference: D. Haldane and S. Loppert (eds, 1999) The arts in health care: learning from experience, London: King's Fund

This text looks at the use of the arts in healthcare in the UK and abroad with a specific emphasis on current research. It includes sections from the UK, USA, Canada, Austria, Germany and Australia. It contains 14 different contributions, the great majority of which comprise research on the links between arts and healthcare. The aim is to provide a valuable contribution to the analysis and evaluation of the use of the arts in a medical context.

 


 The Arts in Health Care: a palette of possibilities - C. Kaye and T. Blee

Reference: C. Kaye and T. Blee (eds, 1997) The arts in health care: a palette of possibilities, London: Jessica Kingsley

Describing current initiatives in the use of the arts in health and health care, this book will stimulate wider interest in the therapeutic aspects of the arts. It covers a very wide range of subjects under the general heading of 'the arts' - from painting to architecture, from music to reminiscence, and from writers-in-residence to food. Adopting a practical approach, the contributors aim to help clinical and professional staff at all levels in health care settings to introduce and develop the use of the arts in their own spheres of influence. They show that the arts must be an integral part of people's lives and stress that environment and the arts can affect the individual and aesthetic stimuli can change mood and behaviour, and possibly aid recovery.

They examine many aspects of the use of the arts, including:

- getting started, whether from scratch or by renovation;

- involving the community;

- involving different user groups, such as older people and people with learning disabilities;

- evaluating the effect of the arts on patients' recovery and on staff attitude;

- examples of projects that have already been set up.

This book is intended to help professionals to improve the quality of life of those in their care. It stresses the importance of continuing development and the need to evaluate the use of the arts and expenditure on them.

 


Foundations of expressive arts therapy: theoretical and clinical perspectives - D Haldane and S. Loppert

Reference: S. K. Levine and E. G. Levine (eds, 1998) Foundations of expressive arts therapy: theoretical and clinical perspectives, London: Jessica Kingsley

Foundations of Expressive Arts Therapy provides an arts-based approach to the theory and practice of expressive arts therapy. The book explores the various expressive arts therapy modalities both individually and in relationship to each other. The contributors emphasize the importance of the imagination and of aesthetic experience, arguing that these are central to psychological well-being, and challenging accepted views which place primary emphasis on the cognitive and emotional dimensions of mental health and development. Part One explores the theory which informs the practice of expressive arts therapy. Part Two relates this theory to the therapeutic application of the expressive arts (including music, art, movement, drama, poetry and voicework) in different contexts, ranging from play therapy with children to trauma work with Bosnian refugees and second-generation Holocaust survivors. Comprehensive in its coverage of the most fundamental aspects of expressive arts therapy, this book is a significant contribution to the field and a useful reference for all practitioners.

 


 Serious fun: the arts in primary health care - B. McDonnell

Reference: B. McDonnell (1996) Serious fun: the arts in primary health care, Dewsbury: Yorkshire and Humberside Arts

(Unable to find abstract - if you find it, please contact the Lapidus Coordinator!)

 


Art as medicine: creating a therapy of the imagination - S. McNiff

Reference: S. McNiff (1992) Art as medicine: creating a therapy of the imagination Boston: Shambhala

This book explores the power of art therapy and describes the pioneering work of Shaun McNiff and other leading art therapy practitioners. It explains how, whenever illness is associated with loss of soul, the arts emerge spontaneously as remedies. Art and image work to expand communication and offer insight outside the scope of the reasoning mind.


Arts in primary health care - M. Miles

Reference: M. Miles (1990) Arts in primary health care Dundee: British Health Care Arts

(Unable to find abstract - if you find it, please contact the Lapidus Coordinator!)

 


Art for health's sake - L. Moss

Reference: L. Moss (1987) Art for health's sake Dunfirmline, Fife: The Carnegie United Kingdom Trust

(Unable to find abstract - if you find it, please contact the Lapidus Coordinator!)

 


The hospital arts handbook - J. Palmer and F. Nash

Reference: J. Palmer and F. Nash (1991) The hospital arts handbook Durham, NC: Duke University Press

This is a handbook designed for those who want to begin an arts program in a hospital or other health care setting and to support a network for existing programs. Contents include a section on the rationale for such a program, including statements about arts and medicine, and the human spirit. A section on the program at the Duke University Medical Center explains why and how it was developed. Next is a how-to section, including sample forms and worksheets, for designing programs in the following disciplines: visual arts, performing arts, literary arts, humanities, and video. There are also sections on arts in medical education, arts in medicine, systems and records, the search for funding, and resources, including organizations, publishers and publications. The last section is a directory of arts programs in health care facilities in the U.S. and two programs in the Great Britain. There is also a list of art therapy organizations.

 


The arts as medicine (a postcard from Withymoor Village Surgery) - M. Rigler

Reference: M. Rigler (1997) ‘The arts as medicine (a postcard from Withymoor Village Surgery’ British Journal of General Practice, 47 (423), pp. 684-685

(Unable to find abstract - if you find it, please contact the Lapidus Coordinator!)

 


Creative writing in health and social care - Fiona Sampson

Reference: Fiona Sampson (ed, 2003) Creative writing in health and social care London: Jessica Kingsley

This unique and comprehensive 'map' of the topic of creative writing in health and social care brings together contributions from health and social care professionals and provides the information needed to teach, counsel and write. Principally exploring poetry and story writing and telling, case studies range from work with pre-literate children in post-war Macedonia to people with dementia in Britain. Complementing these insights, theory-based contributions provide context, comparing different arts therapies using psychoanalytic and phenomenological theories of art and ideas, assessing the value of creative writing in a health care setting, examining methods of training therapists and looking at the aims of creative writing in terms of self development. This holistic approach ensures that Creative Writing in Health and Social Care is an essential guide for health care professionals and others seeking to use creative writing in therapeutic settings.


Helping to heal: the arts in health care - P. Senior and R. Croall

Reference: P. Senior and R. Croall (1993) Helping to heal: the arts in health care London: Calouste Gulbenkian

Charts the growth of the arts for health movement in the UK during the 1980s and 90s. More than 80 photographs illustrate the variety of activities in healthcare centres - music, dance, painting, murals, theatre, sculpture, textiles, and writing.

 


A powerful force for good: culture, health and the arts symposium - an anthology - P. Senior

Reference: P. Senior (2000) A powerful force for good: culture, health and the arts symposium - an anthology Manchester: Manchester Metropolitan University

(Unable to find abstract - if you find it, please contact the Lapidus Coordinator!)

 


View through a window may influence recovery from surgery - R. Ulrich

Reference: R. Ulrich (1984) "View through a window may influence recovery from surgery". Science, 224, pp. 420 -421.

Records on recovery after cholecystectomy of patients in a suburban Pennsylvania hospital between 1972 and 1981 were examined to determine whether assignment to a room with a window view of a natural setting might have restorative influences. Twenty-three surgical patients assigned to rooms with windows looking out on a natural scene had shorter postoperative hospital stays, received fewer negative evaluative comments in nurses' notes, and took fewer potent analgesics than 23 matched patients in similar rooms with windows facing a brick building wall.